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Fair trader

A passion for textiles born in the markets of Mumbai is helping one alum put the power back into the hands of the consumer.

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Home bass

The co-founder and bassist of indie giants Kaiser Chiefs on why he studied in his home town – and how he’s still helping out in Leeds today.

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Sage advisor

As a leading expert on the spread and transmission of Covid-19, Prof Cath Noakes OBE has the attention of the highest level of UK government.

Sage advisor

Fair trader

A passion for textiles born in the markets of Mumbai is helping one alum put the power back into the hands of the consumer.

Read more

Home bass

The co-founder and bassist of indie giants Kaiser Chiefs on why he studied in his home town – and how he’s still helping out in Leeds today.

Read more

Sage advisor

As a leading expert on the spread and transmission of Covid-19, Prof Cath Noakes OBE has the attention of the highest level of UK government.

Sage advisor

From the Editor

The new academic year at Leeds started like no other.

 

The University, and our community, like so much else, had to adapt to the many challenges of the Covid-19 pandemic. Things have been different for all of us, to put it mildly.

 

At the same time, life at Leeds goes on: there are plenty of stories to tell of our research, life on campus and the work of our alumni. Many of these stories reflect the adaptability, ingenuity and creativity that was always a hallmark of Leeds, but more necessary than ever in 2020.

 

Within these pages are entrepreneurs, scientists, rock stars and many others from across our worldwide alumni community. You will meet our 13th Vice-Chancellor, Professor Simone Buitendijk, who shares her impressions and priorities, and we will show how Leeds research continues to make our world a better place. 

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Phil Steel (English Language and Literature 1997)

Head of Alumni Engagement

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From the Vice-Chancellor

The University’s 13th Vice-Chancellor, Professor Simone Buitendijk, has an ambition to see Leeds enhance its global impact.

 

“Universities are important change-makers; I believe we are the only networked institutions that can truly solve global challenges,” said our Vice-Chancellor. “Our alumni have a big role to play in this mission, as our ambassadors in the UK and around the world.”

 

In September, Simone Buitendijk became the first female Vice-Chancellor in the University’s history, joining Leeds following four years as Vice-Provost (Education) and Professor of Maternal and Child Health at Imperial College London. She previously held a senior leadership role as Vice-Rector at Leiden University in the Netherlands, with responsibility for education, student affairs and diversity.

 

“I couldn’t turn down the opportunity to come to Leeds. It is research intensive and comprehensive, which I like – and when I first visited, I could sense the pride people had in this great community. The sense of social responsibility, locally and globally, truly matches my values …
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Professor Simone Buitendijk

Vice-Chancellor

Leeds Alumni From the Editor

From the Editor

The new academic year at Leeds started like no other.   The University, and our community, like so much else, had to adapt to the many challenges of the Covid-19 pandemic. Things have been different ...

Leeds University VC_Desktop_1700x600

From the Vice-Chancellor

The University’s 13th Vice-Chancellor, Professor Simone Buitendijk, has an ambition to see Leeds enhance its global impact.   “Universities are important change-makers; I believe we are the ...

The biochemist who came in from the cold

As a medical student, Laszlo Lorand saw a demonstration that left him amazed. He witnessed blood plasma turn from liquid into a solid clot within a matter of minutes, merely by the addition of a few drops of liquid containing the blood protein thrombin.

This rapid transformation had important life or death implications. While clot formation was essential for healing at sites of injury, if it occurred elsewhere in the body it could result in a fatal thrombosis, or circulatory blockage. Yet despite its physiological importance, how thrombin caused blood to clot remained a mystery, and it was one that Laszlo set out to solve.

In 1946, he joined the Institute of Biochemistry in Budapest, which was led by the Nobel laureate Albert Szent-Györgyi who was an inspirational figure to his staff and students...

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Magazine highlights

Leeds Alumni - Best central banker

Alumni news

Best central banker

Caroline Abel (Economic Studies 1999) won an ‘Oscar of the African banking community’ for her work as Governor of the Central Bank of Seychelles...

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Leeds Alumni - Grant takes students underground

Supporter news

Grant takes students underground

Each year, the Footsteps Fund supports Leeds societies to enhance their activities and improve their service to students...

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Research feature

Turning the plastic tide

Our oceans are choking on plastic, but researchers in Civil Engineering are determined to change this in a generation.

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Leeds does strictly

At the end of last year, the BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing brought some much-needed sparkle to Saturday nights in the UK. Leeds alumni are no strangers to the Strictly ballroom ...

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Leeds does strictly

At the end of last year, the BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing brought some much-needed sparkle to Saturday nights in the UK. Leeds alumni are no strangers to the Strictly ballroom ...

Read more
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A global perspective

Drone shot of the Parkinson Building at night by Steve Fleetwood

Research feature

Reboot your digital wellbeing

Is it time to rethink your digital life?
Dr Bridgette Bewick gives five tips to avoid slipping into unhealthy habits.

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